Inuvialuit Cultural Resource Centre Popular Books

Inuvialuit Cultural Resource Centre Biography & Facts

Inuvialuktun (part of Western Canadian Inuit/Inuktitut/Inuktut/Inuktun) comprises several Inuit language varieties spoken in the northern Northwest Territories by Canadian Inuit who call themselves Inuvialuit. Some dialects and sub-dialects are also spoken in Nunavut. Distribution and varieties Inuvialuktun is spoken by the Inuit of the Mackenzie River delta, Banks Island, part of Victoria Island and the Arctic Ocean coast of the Northwest Territories – the lands of the Inuvialuit Settlement Region. It was traditionally subsumed under a broader Inuktitut. Rather than a coherent language, Inuvialuktun is a politically motivated grouping of three quite distinct and separate varieties. It consists of Sallirmiutun (formerly Siglitun; Inuvialuktun proper), the Kangiryuarmiutun dialect of Inuinnaqtun on Victoria Island in the East and the Uummarmiutun dialect of Iñupiaq around Inuvik and Aklavik in the West. Inuvialuktun, Inuinnaqtun and Inuktitut constitute three of the eleven official languages of the Northwest Territories. Inuinnaqtun is also official alongside Inuktitut in Nunavut. The Inuvialuktun dialects are seriously endangered, as English has in recent years become the common language of the community. Surveys of Inuktitut usage in the NWT vary, but all agree that usage is not vigorous. According to Statistics Canada's 2016 Census 680 (22%) of the 3,110 Inuvialuit speak any form of Inuktitut, and 550 (18%) use it at home. Considering the large number of non-Inuit living in Inuvialuit areas and the lack of a single common dialect among the already reduced number of speakers, the future of the Inuit language in the NWT appears bleak. History Before the 20th century, the Inuvialuit Settlement Region was primarily inhabited by Siglit Inuit, who spoke Siglitun, but in the second half of the 19th century, their numbers were dramatically reduced by the introduction of new diseases. Inuit from Alaska moved into traditionally Siglit areas in the 1910s and 1920s, enticed in part by renewed demand for furs from the Hudson's Bay Company. These Inuit are called Uummarmiut – which means people of the green trees – in reference to their settlements near the tree line. Originally, there was an intense dislike between the Siglit and the Uummarmiut, but these differences have faded over the years, and the two communities are thoroughly intermixed these days. Phonology The phonology of Inuvialuktun and other Inuit languages can be found at Inuit phonology. Most Inuit languages have fifteen consonants and three vowel qualities (with phonemic length distinctions for each). Although Inupiatun and Qawiaraq have retroflex consonants, retroflexes have otherwise disappeared in all the Canadian and Greenlandic dialects. Writing system Inuvialuktun and Inuinnaqtun are written in a Latin alphabet and have no tradition of Inuktitut syllabics. However, the dialects spoken in Nunavut, east of the Inuinnaqtun region use syllabics. Dialects The Inuvialuktun dialects are seriously endangered, as English has in recent years become the common language of the community. Surveys of Inuktitut usage in the NWT vary, but all agree that usage is not vigorous. According to the Inuvialuit Cultural Resource Centre, only 10% of the roughly 4,000 Inuvialuit speak any form of Inuktitut, and only 4% use it at home. Statistics Canada's 2001 Census report is only slightly better, reporting 765 self-identified Inuktitut speakers out of a self-reported Inuvialuit population of 3,905. Considering the large number of non-Inuit living in Inuvialuit areas and the lack of a single common dialect among the already reduced number of speakers, the future of the Inuit language in the NWT appears bleak. From east to west, the dialects are: Iglulingmiut or North Baffin, spoken on western Baffin Island (contrast South Baffin dialect.) Aivilingmiutut or Aivilik on the northern Hudson Bay shore of the Kivalliq Region Kivallirmiutut or Kivalliq or Caribou on the southern Hudson Bay shore of the Kivalliq Region Natsilingmiutut or Netsilik consists of three subdialects: Natsilik proper, Arviligjuaq, Utkuhiksalik Inuinnaqtun consists of four subdialects: Kangiryuarmiutun, Kugluktuk, Bathurst, Cambridge. The Kangiryuarmiutun subdialect is spoken in the small community of Ulukhaktok. Essentially the same as Natsilingmiutut. Siglitun was, until the 1980s, believed to be extinct, but it is still spoken by people in Paulatuk, Sachs Harbour and Tuktoyaktuk. The Inuvialuk dialects spoken in Nunavut (that is, Iglulingmiut, Aivilingmiutut, Kivallirmiutut, and eastern Natsilingmiutut) are often counted as Inuktitut, and the government of the NWT only recognizes Inuinnaqtun and Inuvialuktun. In addition, Uummarmiutun, the dialect of the Uummarmiut which is essentially identical to the Inupiatun dialect spoken in Alaska and so considered an Inupiat language, has conventionally been grouped with Inuvialuktun because it's spoken in the Inuvialuit Settlement Region of the NWT. Uummarmiutun is found in the communities of Inuvik and Aklavik. Example phrases Notes. Discover the Inuvialuit Cultural Resource Centre popular books. Find the top 100 most popular Inuvialuit Cultural Resource Centre books.

Best Seller Inuvialuit Cultural Resource Centre Books of 2024

  • Una Ilisarviga synopsis, comments

    Una Ilisarviga

    Inuvialuit Cultural Resource Centre

    Una Ilisarviga This is my School is a book that follows Saaryuaq through an adventure in her school. Saaryuaq learns something new every day. This book is voiced by Albert Alias. T...

  • Qattayana synopsis, comments

    Qattayana

    Johnny, Ruben, Qummana

    This book Qattayana was originally recorded by Johnny Ruben Qummana. This is an Inuvialuit legend that was based on a recording by Johnny Ruben Qummana.

  • Ilatka synopsis, comments

    Ilatka

    Inuvialuit Cultural Resource Centre

    Ilatka My Family is a language learning book that follows Jane as she grows and talks with her family, Jane explores walking and playing with her parents, brothers and sisters. Thi...

  • Basic Siglit Inuvialuktun Grammar synopsis, comments

    Basic Siglit Inuvialuktun Grammar

    Inuvialuit Cultural Resource Centre

    Committee for Original Peoples Entitlement Inuvik, Northwest Territories, Canada  X0E 0T0 1985

  • Kangiryuarmiut Inuvialuit Dictionary synopsis, comments

    Kangiryuarmiut Inuvialuit Dictionary

    Inuvialuit Cultural Resource Centre

    Kangiryuarmiutun is spoken in the community of Ulukhaktok (formerly called Holman) on Victoria Island, in the Northwest Territories. Kangiryuarmiutun and the varieties of the langu...

  • Basic Kangiryuarmiut Grammar synopsis, comments

    Basic Kangiryuarmiut Grammar

    Inuvialuit Cultural Resource Centre

    Kangiryuarmiutun is spoken in the community of Ulukhaktok (formerly called Holman) on Victoria Island, in the Northwest Territories. Kangiryuarmiutun and the varieties of the langu...

  • Uummarmiut Dictionary for Kindergarten synopsis, comments

    Uummarmiut Dictionary for Kindergarten

    Inuvialuit Cultural Resource Centre

    Design and layout: Camilla Verbonac (Volunteer Parent)  Translations by: Sandra Ipana, Kindergarten Inuvialuktun Teacher  Printed by The Inuvialuit Cultural Resource Cent...